Marketing color Psychology

What’s one easy way to catch your viewers’ attention? Well, COLORS!

Color is a powerful communication tool and can be used to signal action, influence mood, and even influence physiological reactions.

Humans are visual creatures, and we’re so visual that colors can play a vital role in influencing our purchasing decisions. From a young age, we learn association with colors and for sure your favorite color came from positive and happy experiences at a young age. While perceptions of color are somewhat subjective, there are some color effects that have universal meaning.

In the field of design, there is so much that we need to know beyond what each color symbolizes.

Let’s start!

Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Colors

Red, blue and yellow are the primary colors, and they are the base of every other color. They cannot be created by mixing other colors together.

Secondary colors result when two primary colors are mixed together; they include orange, green, and purple.

Tertiary colors are created when a primary color is mixed with a secondary color. Examples of tertiary colors are blue-green, red-orange, and yellow-green.

White and black are not technically colors, but they can be used to create lighter or darker (tints or shades) colors. For example, combining white and red makes pink, and blending black with orange makes brown.

The color wheel

Best known for his physics breakthroughs, Newton mapped the color spectrum into a circle.

Today, the color wheel can help artists and designers find harmonious color combinations based on the geometric relationships represented on the color wheel. As an example, a triadic color scheme involves three evenly-spaced colors on the color wheel and that will yield a bold combination. Meanwhile, a tetradic color scheme involves four colors evenly spaced out on the color wheel and can work if you want to use a dominant color with supporting accent colors.

Color combinations

Complementary

Two colors that are on opposite sides of the color wheel. This combination provides high contrast and high impact color combination – together, these colors will appear brighter and more prominent.

Monochromatic

Two colors that are on opposite sides of the color wheel. This combination provides high contrast and high impact color combination – together, these colors will appear brighter and more prominent.

Analogous

Three colors that are side by side on the color wheel. This color combination is versatile, but can be overwhelming. To balance an analogous color scheme, choose one dominant color, and use the others as accents.

Triadic

Three colors that are evenly spaced on the color wheel. This provides a high contrast color scheme, but less so than the complementary color combination — making it more versatile. This combination creates bold, vibrant color palettes.

Tetradic

Four colors that are evenly spaced on the color wheel. Tetradic color schemes are bold and work best if you let one color be dominant, and use the others as accents. The more colors you have in your palette, the more difficult it is to balance.

COLOR MEANING AND SYMBOLISM

And now as we understand how to pair colors, let’s look into the meaning of individual colors. Color can have a positive and a negative association so you have to ensure that you’re choosing the right for your audience.

YELLOW

RED

BLUE

ORANGE

GREEN

VIOLET

PINK

BROWN

WHITE & BLACK

Some consider white to be a color, because white light comprises all hues on the visible light spectrum. And many do consider black to be a color, because you combine other pigments to create it on paper. But in a technical sense, black and white are not colors, they’re shades. They augment colors and yet they do function like colors. They evoke feelings.